Wednesday, 23 June 2010

• Producer: creates the requirements needed to create a motion picture. The producer coordinates supervises and controls different issues such as funding and managing personnel. They are engaged throughout the all stages of the filmmaking process.

• Executive Producer: this person is usually an investor in the development or just a credit that the filmmaker gave to someone who paid for the credit. There may be more than one executive producer on a project this is all dependant on the financial arrangements of that business.

• Production Manager: supervises all the physical aspects of production, this includes factors such as personnel, technology, budgeting. Ensuring the production is staying on schedule and within budget is the duty of the production manager. They also cover tactical decisions of the business such as day-to-day budgets by organizing the operating costs, production costs and every day equipment rental costs.

• Unit Manager: this role is the same as the production manager howver for a secondary “unit” shooting.

• Production Coordinator: is the information nexus of the production, accountable for sort out all the logistics from hiring crew, renting equipment, and booking talent. The PC is an integral part of film production.

• Post-production supervisor
Post Production Supervisors are responsible for the post production process, during which they maintain clarity of information and good channels of communication between the Producer, Editor, Supervising Sound Editor, the Facilities Companies (such as film labs, CGI studios and negative cutters) and the Production Accountant.

• Director: A film director is a person who guides the actors and crew in the making of a film.[1] He or she controls a film's artistic and dramatic factors, while guiding the technical crew and actors, therefore they are said to be overseeing the creative aspects of a film. They chose the location for film to be shot, camera positioning, use of lighting and film tracks used.

• First Assistant Director (1st AD): assist the production manager and director, it is the responsibility to ensure film comes in on schedule while maintaining a working environment in director, actors and crew can be focused on their work. They cover day-to-day management of the cast, crew, equipment, script and set.

• Second Assistant Director (2nd AD): is the leading assistant of the 1st AD who helps accomplish delegated tasks to the 1st AD. They let crew know about schedules and shooting times etc.

• Production Assistant: aids the first director with set operations. Production assistants mostly are referred to as PAs, they also engage in work situated in the production office and general tasks.

• Script Supervisor: also referred to as “continuity person”, they keep note of what parts of the script need to be shot and making deviations between what was actually filmed and what appeared in the script. Script supervisors also keep track on props, blocking, and other details to ensure continuity from shot to shot and scene to scene.

• Stunt Coordinator: arrange the casting and performance of the stunt which is needed to be performed by stunt performers

• Casting Director: they chose and allocate the characters of the film by allowing them to audition and practice for a particular script.


We had a session with 2 photographers who are involved in a competition in photography. We were given an introduction to photgraphy and they then told us about camera techniques on a camera, they also showed us a variety of pictures which could be interpreted in different ways. Through this session I had learnt basic functions of a camera, such as Focus which is the adjustment that is made to bring the desired area or the desired part to the sharpest point possible. This is usually done manually, but this is also done automatically in some latest digital cameras. I also learnt how to use the macro function on a camera which allowed me to take close up and defined pictures which looked professional and did not blur the picture due to being in close proximity to the camera. We were then each assigned to a camera and were given a task to take a picture which told a story or had a meaning to it.

The second session we had regarding the photography completion involved the photographers showing us where different students were either making mistakes or where there is room for improvements. These were things such as the reason behind why one took a specific picture, or cutting the feet out if it was a portrait picture etc. We then took these ideas into consideration and went out for a second time to overcome these barriers to produce some high-quality photographs.

Monday, 21 June 2010